Most Rev. George Aloysius Carrell, S.J., D.D.

George Aloysius Carrell was born on June 13, 1803 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. His grandfather, a native of Ireland, came to this country in the years before the Revolutionary War. After attending Mt. St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg and Georgetown College, George Aloysius was ordained to the priesthood on December 20, 1827, at St. Augustine Church, Philadelphia.

In 1835, Father Carrell became a member of the Society of Jesus. He was appointed the President of the Jesuit run St. Louis University in 1843. In 1847, he was transferred to Cincinnati and assigned to St. Xavier Preparatory School and was named Director of that same institution two years later. Father Carrell’s last appointment in Cincinnati was that of Rector o f St. Xavier College, a position he held from 1851 until his appointment as the first Bishop of Covington on July 29, 1853. Bishop Carrell was consecrated on November 1, 1853 in Cincinnati, by the Archbishop John B. Purcell.

Bishop Carrell died on September 25, 1868 and was buried at the old St. Mary Cathedral in Covington. His remains were later moved to St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Most Rev. George Aloysius Carrell, S.J.,D.D.

Most Rev. George Aloysius Carrell, S.J.,D.D.

First Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Augustus Maria Toebbe, D.D.

Augustus Maria Toebbe was born on January 15, 1829 at Meppen in the Emsland Province of Hanover. In 1852, he immigrated to the United States in order to study for the priesthood and work in the American missions. Accepted by the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, Augustus began studying at St. Mary Seminary. On the Feast of the Exultation of the Holy Cross, September 14, 1854, he was ordained by Archbishop John B. Purcell.

Most of his early priestly career was spent at the German Parish of St. Philomena in Cincinnati. In the year 1866, Father Toebbe served as a member of the Council of Theologians for the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore.

On November 24, 1869, Father Toebbe received word from Rome that he had been appointed the second Bishop of Covington. The ceremonies of consecration were conducted by Bishop Sylvester Rosecrans of Columbus, Ohio on January 9, 1870. On that same day he was installed at St. Mary’s Cathedral on Eighth Street in Covington.

Bishop Toebbe died on May 2, 1884 and was laid to rest in the burial vault at St. Mary Cathedral. His remains were later moved to St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Most Rev. Augustus Maria Toebbe, D.D.

Most Rev. Augustus Maria Toebbe, D.D.

Second Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Camillus Paul Maes, D.D.

A native of Courtrai, West Flanders, Belgium, Camillus Paul Maes was born on March 13, 1846. While studying in a Belgian Seminary, Maes decided to dedicate himself to the American missions. Father Maes was ordained on December 19, 1868 in Belgium. He arrived in the United States on May 9, 1869 and began his ministry in the Diocese of Detroit.

While serving in Detroit, Father Maes wrote a biography of the Rev. Charles Nerinckx, pioneer priest of Kentucky and co-founder of the Sisters of Loretto at the Foot of the Cross in Marion County, Kentucky. In 1880, Father Maes was appointed Chancellor of the Detroit Diocese.

Father Maes was officially appointed Bishop of Covington on October 1, 1884, the first diocesan priest in Detroit to be elevated to that rank. Archbishop William Elder of Cincinnati performed the consecration on January 25, 1885, at St. Mary Cathedral in Covington. During his long tenure in Covington, Bishop Maes was responsible for erecting the present Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption on Madison Avenue.

Bishop Maes departed this world on May 11, 1915 and was laid to rest at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Most Rev. Camillus Paul Maes, D.D.

Most Rev. Camillus Paul Maes, D.D.

Third Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Ferdinand Brossart, D.D.

Ferdinand Brossart was born on October 19, 1849 in Buchelberg, Bavaria. The Brossart family immigrated to the United States in 1851. The family settled in Cincinnati and became members of St. Michael Parish.

In 1861, the Brossart family relocated to the Gubser’s Mill area of Campbell County, Kentucky. Ferdinand Brossart studied for the Diocese of Covington at St. Mary Seminary in Cincinnati and the American College at Louvain, Belgium. Bishop Augustus M. Toebbe ordained Father Brossart on September 1, 1872, at the old St. Mary Cathedral in Covington.

Father Brossart’s early assignments in the diocese included appointments as the Assistant Pastor at Immaculate Conception Church in Newport, Pastor of St. Edward Church in Cynthiana, and Pastor of St. Paul Church in Lexington. Father Brossart gained a high reputation during a cholera epidemic in Millersburg, Kentucky and a smallpox epidemic in Lexington, by sacrificing his own health to minister to the sick and dying. In 1888, Father Brossart was appointed the Rector of the Cathedral Parish and Vicar General of the diocese. During this period Father Brossart edited the diocesan newspaper under the title of The New Cathedral Chimes.

In November 1915, Father Brossart was appointed the fourth Bishop of Covington. He was consecrated on January 25, 1916 by Archbishop Henry Moeller of Cincinnati. During his administration, Bishop Brossart worked diligently to bring the ornamentation of the present Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption to completion.

Bishop Brossart resigned due to ill health March 14, 1923. He retired to St. Anne Convent in Melbourne, Kentucky where he died on August 6, 1930. He was laid to rest at St. Anne Convent Cemetery in Melbourne.

Most Rev. Ferdinand Brossart, D.D.

Most Rev. Ferdinand Brossart, D.D.

Fourth Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Francis William Howard, D.D.

Francis William Howard, the fifth Bishop of Covington, was born on June 21, 1867 in Columbus Ohio. He studied for the priesthood at Mount St. Mary Seminary of the West in Cincinnati, Ohio and was ordained by Bishop John Watterson on June 16, 1891 at St. Joseph Cathedral in Columbus.

In 1901, Father Howard organized the first Columbus Diocesan School Board. In the following year, he participated in the organization of the National Catholic Education Association. For the next 42 years, Father Howard held offices in the NCEA, including: Secretary General 1903-1928; President 1928-1936; and an Advisory Board member 1936-1944.

Father Howard was appointed the fifth Bishop of Covington on March 26, 1923. He was consecrated by Archbishop Henry Moeller of Cincinnati on July 15, 1923 at St. Mary Cathedral in Covington. During his years in Covington, Bishop Howard worked energetically to expand and improve the schools of the diocese.

Bishop Howard died Jan. 18, 1944 and is buried at St. Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell.

Most Rev. Francis William Howard, D.D.

Most Rev. Francis William Howard, D.D.

Fifth Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. William Theodore Mulloy, D.D., LL.D.

Born on November 9, 1892 in Ardoch, North Dakota, William Theodore Mulloy was the first of five children of William James Mulloy and Margaret Ann Doyle Mulloy.

William T. Mulloy studied for the priesthood at St. Paul Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota. He was ordained by Bishop James Riley of Fargo, North Dakota, on June 7, 1916, at his home parish of St. John the Evangelist at Grafton. As a young priest, Father Mulloy held varied posts in the Diocese of Fargo, including: Pastor, Rector of the Cathedral, Rural Life Director, Superintendent of Education, and Editor of the diocesan newspaper. Father Mulloy was chosen the President of the National Rural Life Conference in 1934.

On November 11, 1944, Father Mulloy was appointed Bishop of Covington to succeed Bishop Howard. He was consecrated by Bishop Aloysius Muench on January 10, 1945 at St. Mary Cathedral in Fargo. Installation ceremonies took place on January 25, 1945 at St. Mary Cathedral in Covington.

After fifteen years of dedicated service, Bishop Mulloy died on June 1, 1959 in Covington. He was laid to rest at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Most Rev. William Theodore Mulloy, D.D., LL.D.

Most Rev. William Theodore Mulloy, D.D., LL.D.

Sixth Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Richard Henry Ackerman, C.S.Sp., S.T.D.

Richard H. Ackerman was born on August 30, 1903 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The future bishop graduated from Duquesne University High School in 1920 and in that same year entered the Duquesne University School of Drama.

Feeling a call to a vocation, Ackerman entered the Congregation of the Holy Ghost in 1921 and made his religious profession at Ridgefield, Connecticut on August 15, 1922. He was ordained to the priesthood on August 28, 1926 at St. Mary Seminary, Norwalk, Connecticut by the Most Rev. Maurice F. McAuliffe, Auxiliary Bishop of Hartford.

From 1926 to 1940, Father Ackerman served in the following positions: Master of Novices of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost, Assistant Pastor of St. Benedict the Moor Parish in Pittsburgh, assistant to the National Director of the Pontifical Association of the Holy Childhood, assistant to the professor of Philosophy at St. Mary Seminary in Norwalk, and Assistant Pastor at St. Mary Parish in Detroit, Michigan. In 1941, he was named National Director of the Holy Childhood Association, and in 1947 was named the Vice President of the Association’s Superior Council.

At the time of his Silver Jubilee of ordination in 1951, Father Ackerman was presented with the Grand Cross “Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice,” by Pope Pius XII.

In 1956, Father Ackerman received the appointment as the first Auxiliary Bishop of San Diego, California and Titular Bishop of Lares. He was consecrated on May 22, 1956, by Bishop John F. Deardon of Pittsburgh at St. Paul Cathedral. Bishop Ackerman was installed at San Diego on May 23, 1956.

He was appointed Bishop of Covington on April 6, 1960 and was installed at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption on May 17, 1960. Bishop Ackerman retired November 28, 1978. At the age of 75, Bishop Ackerman resigned as Bishop of Covington and was appointed Apostolic Administrator of the Diocese until the appointment of Bishop William A. Hughes in 1979.

Bishop Ackerman died on November 18, 1992 and was laid to rest at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky.

Most Rev. Richard Henry Ackerman, C.S.Sp., S.T.D.

Most Rev. Richard Henry Ackerman, C.S.Sp., S.T.D.

Seventh Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. William Anthony Hughes, D.D.

William Anthony Hughes was born on September 23, 1921, in Youngstown, Ohio. He attended Ursuline High School in Youngstown and studied for the priesthood at St. Charles College, Baltimore, Maryland. Hughes graduated from St. Charles College Summa Cum Laude. He continued his studies at St. Mary Seminary, Cleveland, Ohio.

Bishop James McFadden of Youngstown ordained Father Hughes on April 6, 1946 at St. Columban Cathedral. During the first 17 years of his priesthood, he served in various pastoral duties in the Diocese of Youngstown. Father Hughes earned a Masters Degree in Education from Notre Dame University in 1956. In that same year, he was named the first Principal of Cardinal Mooney High School.

In 1961, Pope John XXIII honored him with the title of Monsignor. Msgr. Hughes became the Superintendent of the Diocese of Youngstown Schools and Vicar for Education in 1965. Msgr. Hughes was appointed Auxiliary Bishop of Youngstown and Titular Bishop of Inis Cathaig on July 23, 1974. Bishop James W. Malone ordained Bishop Hughes on September 12, 1974 at St. Columban Cathedral.

Bishop Hughes was appointed Bishop of Covington on April 13, 1979 and installed at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption on May 8, 1979. He served the diocese for 16 years until his retirement on July 4, 1995.

Bishop Hughes died Feb. 7, 2013, and was laid to rest at St. Mary Cemetery, Ft. Mitchell, Ky.

Most Rev. William Anthony Hughes, D.D.

Most Rev. William Anthony Hughes, D.D.

Eighth Bishop of Covington

Most Rev. Robert William Muench, D.D.

Robert William Muench was born on December 28, 1942 in Louisville, Kentucky. The Muench family moved to New Orleans, Louisiana when Robert was a small child.

Following a call to a vocation, Robert Muench attended St. Joseph Seminary in St. Benedict, Louisiana and Notre Dame Seminary, New Orleans. At Notre Dame Seminary, he earned a Bachelors Degree in Philosophy in 1964. The future bishop earned a Masters Degree in Education (Guidance and Counseling) from the Theological College of the C        atholic University of America in Washington D.C. in 1968.

Father Muench was ordained to the priesthood on May 18, 1968 by Archbishop Philip Hannan of New Orleans. Among his early assignments as a priest of the archdiocese included: teacher, counselor, and eventually Rector of St. John Vianney Preparatory School in New Orleans; associate pastor of several New Orleans area parishes; and Co-Pastor of St. Matthias Parish, New Orleans. In 1976, Father Muench was appointed Vicar for Formation of the archdiocese, and in 1981, Vocation Director.

In 1982, Father Muench established and became the first Director of the Pope John XXIII House for Vocational Discernment. In the following year he was named assistant to Archbishop Hannan. Pope John Paul II elevated Father Muench to the rank of Monsignor in 1985, which was followed by his appointment as Vicar General and Moderator of the Curia for the Archdiocese of New Orleans in 1989.

On May 8, 1990, Msgr. Muench was appointed an Auxiliary Bishop of New Orleans. He was installed on June 29, 1990, as Auxiliary Bishop and to the Titular See of Mactaris.

Bishop Muench was appointed the ninth Bishop of Covington on January 5, 1996 and was installed on March 19, 1996 at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption in Covington.

On December 15, 2001 it was announced that Pope John Paul II had appointed him fifth Bishop of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He was installed on March 14, 2002.

Most Rev. Robert William Muench, D.D.

Most Rev. Robert William Muench, D.D.

Ninth Bishop of Covington