Bishop Foys announces Year of Prayer for Priestly Vocations

By: David Cooley

Bishop Roger Foys has announced that he has designated the coming year as the “Year of Prayer for Priestly Vocations.” The year will officially begin with solemn vespers at the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption, Covington, on the solemnity of Christ the King, Nov. 26, and conclude on the same solemnity in 2018.

Bishop Roger Foys is asking the faithful to continue to pray for vocations to the priesthood, diaconate and consecrated life, but especially to the priesthood during this special year.

While a primary focus throughout the year will be prayer within family life there will also be a strong emphasis on prayer for vocations within the diocesan schools.

Bishop Foys, Father Andrew Young, vocations promoter, and other diocesan priests will visit every one of the high schools, celebrate Mass, and spend an extended amount of time with the students, focusing on vocations. These events will be called “Vocations Day.” Father Young will also be visiting the diocesan grade schools.

In each of the five deaneries, throughout the year, there will be “Deanery Discernment Events” that will include Holy Hours, presentations, dinner, social time and other group activities. Throughout the year, there will also be special articles featured in the Messenger, giving readers insight to the vocations of many of the priests currently serving in the diocese. The same prayer for priestly vocations will be prayed at every parish during each weekend Mass. This prayer will be prayed either as a conclusion to the Prayer of the Faithful or at the end of the Mass.

“The whole year has a dual purpose,” said Bishop Foys in an interview with the Messenger. “First, the purpose is to pray for vocations; and, second, to raise the consciousness of our people about vocations and the need for vocations in order for them to make that vocation culture a part of their life.”

Bishop Foys said that he is very excited about this upcoming year. What’s great about it is that everyone can pray for vocations and raise awareness of the need for priests and vocations, he said.

“The faithful can begin by praying as a family for vocations and they can also encourage, not only their children and grandchildren, but also the people in their parish whom they might believe have a vocation to the priesthood, religious life or the diaconate. Encouragement is sometimes all these young people need,” he said. “It is important to also support the seminarians we have now. Our people are very generous with their financial support, and our hope is that they are also generous with their prayers. A parish that has a seminarian stationed at their church should also do their best to encourage him.”

Bishop Foys said that when he goes on school visits and talks with the students or when he talks to the confirmandi and asks the young men if they have ever thought about being a priest, more often than not they’ll say, “Yes.” Moreover, when he asks the children before their confirmation if there is anyone in their class who would make a good priest they all, invariably, point to one or two young men.

“So, these things are in their thoughts and consciousness,” he said.

Bishop Foys has been heard to say, often, that God, of course, is still calling but people aren’t listening and God’s voice is drowned out by many other things.

“It is our culture in general — the secular society has become so engrained in people,” he said. “The Church at one time was the center of people’s lives. Now, we live in a different time. In this age, the priority of priesthood and religious life doesn’t often rise to the top.”

Bishop Foys said that another issue is that the visibility of the numerous priests and women religious at the schools interacting with the children has extremely declined.

“I look at the history of our schools here and, at one time, they were staffed by almost all priests and religious sisters and brothers,” he said. “It was unusual to have a lay teacher.”

Bishop Foys said that he believes the Year for Prayer for Priestly Vocations is, at the very least, a step in the right direction.

“Prayer,” said Bishop Foys, “should be the first step, when it is time to make a decision or if there is some kind of need. It is the first step, not the last step — we should put whatever it is in God’s hands first.”

Aware that, these days, people are very busy, Bishop Foys said that the faithful should take at least 10 minutes a day to pray.

“Go off by yourself somewhere; read the Scriptures,” he said. “The hope that goes along with that is if you take that small amount of time, eventually you will want to do more.”

Bishop Foys said that the Year of Prayer for Priestly Vocations is a time to reflect on the importance of priests in society and in the lives of God’s people.

“A priest is another Christ,” he said. “The priest is called to minister to God’s people. The priesthood is a life of serving. The priest, through the Mass and the sacraments, brings the Lord to people and the people to the Lord. He is a conduit.

“If someone asked me at the end of my life, how would I determine if it was a success or not, I would say that if I brought just one person to Christ, for me, that would be a success.”

Two schools celebrate 2017 Blue Ribbon designation

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy Devos announced Sept. 28 that 342 schools across the country, including two in the Diocese of Covington, have been recognized as National Blue Ribbon Schools for 2017.

The two diocesan schools are St. Joseph School, Crescent Springs, and Villa Madonna Academy (elementary) in Villa Hills.

“Congratulations” to the two school communities “on achieving the highest national recognition bestowed on a school,” said Michael Clines, superintendent for Catholic schools.

This is the second time that both local schools have received Blue Ribbons – St. Joseph School in 2006 and Villa Madonna Elementary in 2007. They are two of the 15 Blue Ribbon Schools in the Diocese of Covington.

2018 World Meeting of Families

“The Gospel of the Family: Joy for the World” is the theme for the 2018 World Meeting of Families in Dublin, Ireland, Aug. 22-26, 2018. Participants will encounter Jesus Christ, experience his universal Church and return home empowered for discipleship.

You are invited to join other pilgrims from the Diocese of Covington!

To find out more information or to register to attend the 2018 World Meeting of Families, visit the Diocese of Covington website at www.covdio.org/catechesis-formation or call the director of the Office of Catechesis and Faith Formation, Isaak Isaak, at (859) 392-1500.

A priestly vocation in mind? Or know someone who might need a nudge?

Discernment Dinner for Men

 

On the first Sunday of every month the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption, 12th and Madison in Covington, hosts a Discernment Dinner at the Cathedral rectory for men (high school age and older) who are discerning a vocation to the priesthood, open to the possibility of a vocation or would simply like to have questions answered about the priesthood or seminary. These dinners begin at 6:30 p.m. and usually last about 60-90 minutes. The next dates are Aug. 6, Sept. 3 and Oct. 1.